EUSTRESS

Introduction
Eustress is a form of stress that is beneficial to an individual. It is a positive response to a challenge or an opportunity that can help motivate and propel an individual to success (Kahn, 1990). Eustress has been linked to better physical and mental health, improved performance, and higher levels of creativity (Aldwin, 1994). This article will provide an overview of eustress, its benefits, and how it can be managed.

Definition
Eustress is a term coined by endocrinologist Hans Selye, who defined it as “the non-specific response of the body to any demand for change” (Selye, 1974). Eustress is a positive form of stress that can help promote growth and development. It is often seen as a motivator, a challenge, or an opportunity for individuals to reach their goals.

Benefits
Eustress has been linked to a number of positive outcomes. It can help individuals to focus and be more productive, as well as to develop new skills and become more resilient (Lazarus, 1999). It has also been shown to boost creativity, increase motivation, and improve performance (Aldwin, 1994). Additionally, eustress has been linked to better physical and mental health, as well as improved quality of life (Kahn, 1990).

Managing Eustress
In order to manage eustress, it is important to understand the difference between eustress and distress. Distress is a negative form of stress that can have a negative effect on health and performance, whereas eustress is beneficial to an individual (Lazarus, 1999). It is important to recognize when stress is becoming too much and to take steps to manage it.

Conclusion
Eustress is a positive form of stress that can have a number of benefits. It can help to motivate individuals and propel them to success. It is important to understand the difference between eustress and distress and to take steps to manage eustress when it becomes too much.

References
Aldwin, C. M. (1994). Stress, coping, and development: An integrative perspective. New York: Guilford Press.

Kahn, R.L. (1990). Psychological conditions of personal engagement and disengagement at work. Academy of Management Journal, 33(4), 692-724.

Lazarus, R.S. (1999). Stress and emotion: A new synthesis. New York: Springer.

Selye, H. (1974). Stress without distress. Philadelphia: Lippincott.

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