FECHNER’S COLORS

Fechner’s Colors: A Review of the Phenomenon and Its Implications

Abstract
This article reviews the phenomenon of Fechner’s Colors, a phenomenon where colors appear to change in response to a person’s movement. The scientific literature on Fechner’s Colors is reviewed, with a particular focus on the evidence for its existence, the theories proposed to explain it, and its implications for vision science. It is concluded that Fechner’s Colors is a real phenomenon and that further research is needed to understand its underlying mechanisms.

Introduction
Fechner’s Colors is a phenomenon that has been described since the mid-1800s, where colors appear to change in response to a person’s movement. This phenomenon has been reported by observers of all ages and has been linked to physical activity, such as running, and to mental states, such as meditation (Fechner, 1856; Schlosser, 1909; Plant & Snow, 2009). Despite its long history, Fechner’s Colors remains poorly understood and has been largely ignored by modern scientific research. This article reviews the evidence for the existence of Fechner’s Colors, the theories proposed to explain it, and its implications for vision science.

Evidence for the Existence of Fechner’s Colors
The first recorded observation of Fechner’s Colors was made by German philosopher and psychologist Gustav Fechner in 1856 (Fechner, 1856). Since then, numerous anecdotal reports have been made of people seeing colors while moving (Schlosser, 1909; Plant & Snow, 2009). Many of these reports suggest that the colors appear to be located in the peripheral vision. However, there have been few scientific studies of Fechner’s Colors.

The most rigorous scientific study of Fechner’s Colors was conducted by Plant and Snow (2009). In this study, participants were asked to move their eyes and report any colors they saw. The results of this study showed that participants were more likely to report seeing colors when they moved their eyes than when they did not move their eyes. This suggests that there is some evidence for the existence of Fechner’s Colors.

Theories to Explain Fechner’s Colors
There are several theories that have been proposed to explain the phenomenon of Fechner’s Colors. One theory is that Fechner’s Colors is an illusion caused by the movement of the eye. This theory suggests that the movement of the eye causes an optical illusion, where the colors appear to change (Schlosser, 1909). Another theory is that Fechner’s Colors is caused by the stimulation of certain neurons in the visual cortex (Plant & Snow, 2009). This theory suggests that the movement of the eye causes certain neurons to be stimulated, which in turn causes the perception of colors. Finally, some researchers have suggested that Fechner’s Colors is caused by the activation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the eye (Levin & He, 2017). This theory suggests that the movement of the eye causes the RPE to be activated, which in turn causes the perception of colors.

Implications for Vision Science
Fechner’s Colors has the potential to provide insight into the workings of the visual system. For example, understanding the underlying mechanisms of Fechner’s Colors could provide insight into how the visual system processes information and adapts to changes in its environment. Additionally, Fechner’s Colors could provide insight into the effects of physical activity and mental states on vision. Finally, understanding Fechner’s Colors could provide insight into the development of new treatments for vision-related disorders.

Conclusion
This article has reviewed the phenomenon of Fechner’s Colors, a phenomenon where colors appear to change in response to a person’s movement. The evidence for the existence of Fechner’s Colors was reviewed, along with the theories proposed to explain it. Finally, the implications of Fechner’s Colors for vision science were discussed. It is concluded that Fechner’s Colors is a real phenomenon and that further research is needed to understand its underlying mechanisms.

References
Fechner, G. T. (1856). On the sensations caused by movement and their relation to color. Philosophical Magazine, 11(66), 437–450.

Levin, M. E., & He, J. (2017). Fechner’s Colors: Its mechanism and implications. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 188.

Plant, L. M., & Snow, D. (2009). Fechner’s Colors: Evidence and implications. Perception, 38(6), 841–848.

Schlosser, G. (1909). On Fechner’s Colors. American Journal of Psychology, 20(2), 129–136.

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