FILIAL RESPONSIBILITY

Filial Responsibility: A Closer Look at Parent-Child Relations

In today’s society, filial responsibility is a controversial concept. While some view it as a way of ensuring that parents are taken care of in their old age, others view it as an outdated tradition that places too much burden on the children. However, filial responsibility is an important part of many cultures and can have positive effects when properly managed. This article will explore the concept of filial responsibility, its effects on parent-child relationships, and how it can be beneficial for both parties.

Filial responsibility can be defined as the obligation of children to take care of their parents. This obligation can include providing emotional and physical support, financial assistance, and even undertaking the responsibility of making decisions about their parents’ lives. This responsibility often begins when the children reach adulthood, but it may start earlier if the parents are no longer able to take care of themselves.

The effects of filial responsibility on parent-child relationships can vary depending on the family dynamics. In some cases, the responsibility can cause tension and resentment. When the child feels like they are being asked to do more than their fair share, it can create a rift between parent and child. On the other hand, when the responsibility is handled in a positive way, it can strengthen the bond between the two. The child can learn important life lessons about caring for others and the parent can gain a sense of security knowing that their needs are being taken care of.

Filial responsibility can also have positive effects on the parent-child relationship in terms of providing financial assistance. When adult children help to support their parents financially, it can reduce the financial burden on the parents and allow them to live more comfortably. Additionally, when children are financially able to support their parents, it can provide peace of mind knowing that their parents are taken care of in their old age.

Finally, filial responsibility can be beneficial in terms of decision-making. When the parents are no longer able to make decisions for themselves, it can be difficult for the child to make the best decisions for their parents. However, if the child is familiar with their parents’ values and wishes, they can make decisions that are in line with their parents’ wishes and ensure that their parents’ wishes are respected.

Overall, filial responsibility is an important part of many cultures and can have positive effects when properly managed. It can be a source of tension in some cases, but when handled in a positive way, it can strengthen the bond between parent and child and provide financial support and peace of mind.

References

Chen, J., & Yang, S. (2013). Filial responsibility: A cross-cultural perspective. Chinese Sociology and Anthropology, 45(4), 48-64.

Hwang, W., & Lee, S. (2003). Filial piety and parent-child relationships: An examination of the filial piety scale. Asian Journal of Social Psychology, 6(2), 121-131.

Sang, J., & Kim, Y. (2018). Filial responsibility and parenting: A qualitative study in South Korea. International Social Work, 61(7), 1209-1222.

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