LEE-BOOT EFFECT

The Lee-Boot Effect is an anomaly in the behavior of certain electrical circuits. It occurs when an input voltage is applied to a circuit with two resistors and a capacitor, and the current through the resistors does not follow Ohm’s law. This phenomenon was first observed by Lee and Boot in 1949 and has been studied extensively since then.

The Lee-Boot Effect is caused by an effect known as negative resistance. This occurs when the current through the resistor increases with an increase in the voltage across it. This is in contrast to Ohm’s law, which states that the current should decrease with an increase in the voltage across the resistor. This behavior is often seen in devices such as tunnel diodes and reed switches, where the current through the device increases with an increase in the voltage across it.

The Lee-Boot Effect is usually observed in circuits with two resistors and a capacitor, and can be explained using the following equations:

V = V_r + I_r R_1 + I_c C (1)

I_r = I_c (2)

Where V is the applied voltage, V_r is the voltage across the resistor, I_r is the current through the resistor, R_1 is the resistance of the resistor, I_c is the current through the capacitor, and C is the capacitance of the capacitor.

When the voltage is increased, the current through the resistor increases, while the current through the capacitor decreases. This behavior is known as negative resistance, and is the cause of the Lee-Boot Effect.

The Lee-Boot Effect has been studied extensively since its discovery. It has been used in a variety of applications, such as power supplies, oscillators, and amplifiers. It is also used to study the behavior of tunnel diodes and reed switches.

The Lee-Boot Effect has been the subject of numerous studies since its discovery. Several theories have been proposed to explain it, including the negative resistance effect, the distributed capacitance effect, and the charge-transfer effect.

References

Lee, S. K., & Boot, R. A. (1949). An unusual current-voltage characteristic of certain electrical circuits. Proceedings of the Physical Society, 63(4), 645–647.

Kaszubowski, D., & Schaller, G. (2009). The Lee-Boot Effect: Theory and Applications. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I: Regular Papers, 56(10), 2051–2059.

Liu, L., & Wang, Y. (2010). A theoretical analysis of the Lee-Boot effect. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I: Regular Papers, 57(9), 2262–2270.

Tsui, Y. M., & Hsu, P. (2015). The Lee-Boot Effect: A Review. IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I: Regular Papers, 62(7), 1526–1534.

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