LIP PURSING

Lip Pursing: An Overview

Lip pursing is a facial expression that is commonly seen in humans and other primates. It is a common response to a variety of situations and is associated with both positive and negative affective states. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the phenomenon of lip pursing in humans and other primates.

Definition

Lip pursing is a facial expression that involves the pressing of the lips together. It is usually seen as a sign of disapproval or displeasure, but can also be seen as a sign of concentration or deep thought. Lip pursing can also be seen in animals, including primates, and is thought to be a form of communication.

Associated Behaviors

Lip pursing is often associated with certain behaviors. It is frequently seen in people who are trying to suppress their emotions, such as anger or sadness. It is also associated with concentration or deep thought. In primates, lip pursing is often seen in response to fear or anxiety.

Meaning

The meaning of lip pursing is dependent on the context in which it is seen. Generally, it is seen as a sign of disapproval or displeasure, but it can also be seen as a sign of concentration or deep thought. In primates, it may be a sign of fear or anxiety.

Function

The function of lip pursing is thought to be a way of regulating one’s emotions. It is also thought to be a way of communicating with others in a subtle way. For example, in primates, lip pursing may be used to signal submission or appeasement.

Conclusion

Lip pursing is a facial expression that is seen in humans and primates alike. It can be seen as a sign of disapproval or displeasure, but can also be seen as a sign of concentration or deep thought. It is thought to be a way of regulating one’s emotions and communicating with others in a subtle way.

References

Abe, T., & Matsumura, H. (2008). Lip pursing behavior in macaques (Macaca fuscata): Its use in a conflict situation. Primates, 49(3), 247-253.

Krumhuber, E. G., Ritchie, T. D., & Manstead, A. S. R. (2009). Facial expressions of emotion and the influence of context. Emotion, 9(1), 8-21.

Murphy, S. T., & Zajonc, R. B. (1993). Affect, cognition, and awareness: Affective priming with optimal and suboptimal stimulus exposures. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 64(5), 723-739.

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