METAPSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE

Metapsychological Profile: A Tool for Understanding Personality

Personality assessment is an important component of psychological practice. It helps to identify individual strengths and weaknesses, which can inform treatment decisions. The metapsychological profile is an assessment tool that has been used to gain insight into personality and its development. This article will discuss the metapsychological profile, its components, and the implications for psychological practice.

The metapsychological profile (MP) is a personality assessment that was developed by ErnestBecker in the 1950s. It is based on psychoanalytic theories of personality, which emphasize the unconscious processes that influence behavior. The MP consists of 13 components, all of which are scored on a 0–10 scale. These components include: aggression, autonomy, identity, anxiety, guilt, morality, creativity, empathy, love, libido, control, and dominance. Each component is scored based on an individual’s responses to questions related to the component.

The MP has been used to gain insight into personality development. It has been found that individuals with higher scores on the aggression, autonomy, and identity components tend to have higher self-esteem and better social functioning. Conversely, those with lower scores on these components tend to have poorer self-esteem and social functioning. Additionally, individuals with higher scores on the anxiety, guilt, and morality components tend to have more difficulty managing their emotions, while those with lower scores tend to have better emotional regulation.

The MP can be used to inform treatment decisions. By understanding an individual’s personality profile, clinicians can tailor their treatment approach to target areas of difficulty. For example, those with higher scores on the aggression, autonomy, and identity components may benefit from cognitive-behavioral therapy, while those with higher scores on the anxiety, guilt, and morality components may benefit from psychodynamic therapy.

In conclusion, the metapsychological profile is a valuable tool for understanding personality and its development. It can help inform treatment decisions and provide insight into an individual’s strengths and weaknesses. Further research is needed to better understand the implications of the MP for psychological practice.

References

Becker, E. (1953). The metapsychological profile: A psychoanalytic tool. American Psychologist, 8(7), 488-494.

Kernberg, O. F. (1992). Aggression in personality disorders and perversions. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

McWilliams, N. (2011). Psychoanalytic diagnosis: Understanding personality structure in the clinical process (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Guilford Press.

Rosenberg, M. (1965). Society and the adolescent self-image. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Scroll to Top