RETROLENTAL FIBROPLASIA

Retrolental Fibroplasia (RLF) is a rare disorder characterized by the abnormal growth of retrolental fibroblasts, a type of cells that line the eye. RLF is most commonly seen in prematurely born infants who are exposed to high levels of oxygen in their incubators. It is a leading cause of blindness in children and the leading cause of blindness in preterm infants in the United States (Kang, Lee, & Park, 2014).

RLF is caused by the overproduction of fibroblasts in the retina of the eye. These cells produce proteins that promote the growth of abnormal blood vessels, which can cause the retina to detach from the back of the eye. This can lead to scarring and the loss of vision in the affected area. In severe cases, RLF can lead to complete blindness (Kang et al., 2014).

The risk factors for developing RLF include being born prematurely, having a low birth weight, being exposed to high levels of oxygen in an incubator, and having a family history of RLF. The risk is increased if the infant is exposed to oxygen levels greater than 30% for more than two weeks (Kang et al., 2014).

RLF can be treated with a combination of surgery, laser therapy, and pharmacological agents. Surgical treatments involve removing the abnormal blood vessels and scar tissue. Laser therapy is used to reduce the risk of retinal detachment. Pharmacological agents are used to reduce inflammation and prevent the formation of new abnormal vessels (Kang et al., 2014).

In conclusion, Retrolental Fibroplasia is a rare disorder that can lead to blindness in premature infants. It is caused by the overproduction of fibroblasts in the retina of the eye. Risk factors for developing RLF include being born prematurely, having a low birth weight, being exposed to high levels of oxygen in an incubator, and having a family history of RLF. Treatment of RLF can involve surgery, laser therapy, and pharmacological agents.

References

Kang, S. Y., Lee, H., & Park, H. (2014). Retrolental Fibroplasia. Korean Journal of Ophthalmology, 28(3), 191–198. https://doi.org/10.3341/kjo.2014.28.3.191

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