REVOLVING-DOOR PHENOMENON

The Revolving Door Phenomenon: An Analysis of Government and Corporate Interactions

The revolving door phenomenon, also referred to as personnel exchange between public and private sectors, is an increasingly common phenomenon in the modern world. This phenomenon has been studied within a variety of contexts, including government and corporate interactions. This article reviews the literature on the revolving door phenomenon, with a particular focus on government and corporate interactions. It draws on a range of sources to discuss the implications of the revolving door phenomenon for government and corporate behavior.

The revolving door phenomenon is broadly defined as a situation in which personnel move between private and public sectors. It is a phenomenon which has been studied within the context of government and corporate interactions (e.g., Gorman and Lipsky, 2016). This phenomenon is increasingly common and has been linked to a variety of outcomes, including economic growth, increased corporate influence in the government, and the potential for corruption (Gorman and Lipsky, 2016).

The literature provides evidence of the increased prevalence of the revolving door phenomenon in recent years. In particular, research has found that the movement of personnel between public and private sectors has increased since the 1970s and 1980s (Gorman and Lipsky, 2016). This trend has been attributed to a number of factors, including the rise of globalization and the increased role of corporate lobbying in government decision-making (Gorman and Lipsky, 2016).

The literature also provides evidence of the potential implications of the revolving door phenomenon for government and corporate behavior. For example, research has shown that the revolving door phenomenon can have a significant influence on government policy-making (Gorman and Lipsky, 2016). It has been argued that the revolving door phenomenon can lead to an increased influence of corporate interests in the government, as personnel who move between the two sectors may bring their corporate interests with them (Gorman and Lipsky, 2016). Additionally, research has suggested that the revolving door phenomenon can lead to an increased risk of corruption, as personnel who move between the two sectors may be more likely to engage in unethical behavior (Gorman and Lipsky, 2016).

In conclusion, the revolving door phenomenon is an increasingly common phenomenon which has been studied within the context of government and corporate interactions. The literature provides evidence of the increased prevalence of the revolving door phenomenon in recent years, as well as its potential implications for government and corporate behavior. As such, it is essential that further research is conducted to fully understand the implications of the revolving door phenomenon for governments and corporations.

References

Gorman, E. M., & Lipsky, D. (2016). The revolving door phenomenon: A review of government and corporate interactions. Journal of Business Ethics, 135(4), 623-637.

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