SAMPLING FRAME

Sampling frame is a term used in survey research that refers to the source material or device from which a sample is drawn. Sampling frames can be defined as a list, enumeration, or some other device used to identify the population from which the sample is drawn (Krejcie & Morgan, 1970). In some cases, the sampling frame is a simple list of names, such as a mailing list or telephone directory. In others, it may be a more complex list, such as a map showing the exact locations of particular types of houses.

The sampling frame is an important aspect of survey design, as it determines the population from which the sample is drawn (Krejcie & Morgan, 1970). To ensure that the sample is representative of the population, the sampling frame must be complete and up-to-date. When the sampling frame is incomplete or outdated, the sample will be biased and the results will be inaccurate.

In addition, the sampling frame must be specific to the research question being asked. For example, if a researcher is interested in examining the opinions of college students, the sampling frame should include only college-aged students, not the general population. This ensures that the sample is representative of the population of interest.

The sampling frame also affects the sample size. If the sampling frame is incomplete or outdated, the sample size will need to be larger to ensure that the sample is representative of the population. Conversely, if the sampling frame is complete and up-to-date, a smaller sample size may be sufficient (Krejcie & Morgan, 1970).

In summary, sampling frame is an important aspect of survey research that refers to the source material or device from which a sample is drawn. It is essential that the sampling frame is complete and up-to-date in order to ensure that the sample is representative of the population. The sampling frame also affects the sample size, with larger samples being needed if the sampling frame is incomplete or outdated.

References

Krejcie, R. V., & Morgan, D. W. (1970). Determining sample size for research activities. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 30(3), 607-610.

Scroll to Top