SCALA VESTIBULI

Introduction
The vestibular system is an important component of the human body, responsible for maintaining balance, posture, and motor coordination. It is composed of two main components: the vestibule and the semicircular canals. The vestibule is a hollow, cone-shaped structure located between the two semicircular canals. It is divided into two chambers, the utricle and the saccule. The saccule is further divided into the scala vestibuli and the scala tympani. The scala vestibuli is a fluid-filled canal that runs up the length of the vestibule and serves as the main pathway for sound waves to enter the inner ear.

Structure and Function
The scala vestibuli is a cochlear duct that is located between the utricle and the saccule. It is filled with a fluid called perilymph, which is similar to the cerebrospinal fluid found in the central nervous system. The perilymph acts as an insulator and conductor of sound waves, allowing them to travel through the scala vestibuli and reach the inner ear. The walls of the scala vestibuli are lined with hair cells, which are sensitive to sound and movement. When sound waves hit the hair cells, they generate electrical signals that are transmitted to the brain.

Clinical Implication
The scala vestibuli is an important structure for hearing and balance. Disorders of the scala vestibuli can cause hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, vertigo, and balance problems. The most common disorder of the scala vestibuli is Meniere’s disease, which is caused by an increase in fluid pressure in the inner ear. Other diseases that can affect the scala vestibuli include perilymphatic fistula, otosclerosis, and vestibular neuritis.

Conclusion
The scala vestibuli is an important structure of the inner ear that is responsible for hearing and balance. Disorders of the scala vestibuli can cause hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, vertigo, and balance problems. It is important for clinicians to be aware of the clinical implications of disorders of the scala vestibuli to diagnose and treat patients with hearing and balance problems.

References
Fischer, C. (2018). Vestibular System: Overview, Anatomy, Pathophysiology. Retrieved from https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1919084-overview

Chang, A., & Klockhoff, I. (2015). Perilymphatic Fistula. Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, 152(2), 335–337. http://doi.org/10.1177/0194599814565405

Gates, G., & Schubert, M. (2005). Vestibular Neuritis. American Family Physician, 71(5), 909–912.

Brown, M. (2017). Meniere’s Disease. Retrieved from https://www.healthline.com/health/menieres-disease#symptoms

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