SCHIZOID PERSONALITY (Schizo- thymic Personality)

SCHIZOID PERSONALITY: DEFINITION, HISTORY, AND FURTHER READING

Personality is an individual’s characteristic manner of thinking, feeling, and behaving. Schizoid personality is a cluster of personality traits that is characterized by a pervasive pattern of social detachment, indifference to the opinion of others, and emotional coldness. People with schizoid personality tend to be loners who have little to no interest in close personal relationships and prefer to be alone. They are typically indifferent to the praise and criticism of others, and often find it difficult to express their own emotions. This article will discuss the definition of schizoid personality, its history, and offer further reading for those interested in learning more.

Definition

Schizoid personality is defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as a “pervasive pattern of social detachment, indifference to the opinion of others, and emotional coldness”. People with schizoid personality tend to be loners and prefer to be alone. They are typically indifferent to the praise and criticism of others and often find it difficult to express their own emotions.

History

Schizoid personality was first described by psychiatrist Ernest Kretschmer in 1921, who observed a “schizoid disposition” in some of his patients. This was further developed in the 1940s by psychoanalyst Harry Stack Sullivan, who developed a psychoanalytic theory of schizoid personality. He proposed that schizoid individuals had difficulty forming relationships with others because of an underlying fear of intimacy.

Further Reading

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association.

Kretschmer, E. (1921). Klinische Psychopathologie. Berlin: Springer.

Parikh, P. (2013). Schizoid personality disorder: Clinical features and diagnosis. Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine, 35(3), 238–242.

Sullivan, H.S. (1953). The Interpersonal Theory of Psychiatry. New York, NY: Norton.

Trull, T.J., Widiger, T.A., & Burr, R. (2013). The classification of personality disorder. In T. Widiger, A. T. Simonsen, M. S. Krueger, & E. F. First (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Personality Disorders. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.

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