SELF PSYCHOLOGY

Self Psychology is a psychoanalytic theory that places emphasis on the importance of a strong sense of self in psychological health and well-being. Developed by Heinz Kohut in the 1970s, Self Psychology is based on the idea that people are born with an innate capacity for self-reflection and a need to feel connected to others. It is a holistic approach to psychotherapy, emphasizing the importance of understanding the patient’s subjective experience in order to help him or her achieve psychological health and satisfaction.

Self Psychology places particular emphasis on the development of empathy in the therapeutic relationship. Kohut believed that empathy was the key to helping a patient achieve psychological health, by providing a safe space in which to explore and understand one’s own feelings and experiences. He also believed that a therapeutic relationship could provide the patient with a sense of connection and belonging, which could help him or her to become more self-aware and resilient.

The main goals of Self Psychology are to help the patient develop a greater understanding of their own sense of self and to reconnect with their own internal experience. Through the development of empathy and understanding, the patient is able to gain insight into their own motivations and behaviors, as well as the forces that have shaped their lives. Through this process, the patient can gain insight into the factors that have influenced their psychological health and begin to make positive changes.

Self Psychology has been used in the treatment of a variety of psychological disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and personality disorders, as well as in the treatment of trauma and grief. It has also been used in the treatment of addiction and substance abuse. Research has shown that Self Psychology can be effective in both short-term and long-term therapy and can help patients gain insight into themselves and their relationships with others.

Overall, Self Psychology is a valuable psychoanalytic theory that emphasizes the importance of understanding the patient’s subjective experience in order to help him or her achieve psychological health and satisfaction. Through the development of empathy and understanding, the patient can gain insight into their own motivations and behaviors, and make positive changes in their lives.

References

Deutsch, H. (2018). Self psychology. In American Psychological Association. Retrieved from https://www.apa.org/pi/about/publications/caregivers/practice-settings/self-psychology

Kohut, H. (1971). The analysis of the self: A systematic approach to the psychoanalytic treatment of narcissistic personality disorders. New York: International Universities Press.

Luborsky, M. (2012). Self psychology. In Encyclopedia of psychology. Retrieved from https://www.psychologyencyclopedia.com/psychology/self-psychology/

Schultz, D. P., & Schultz, S. E. (2015). Theories of personality (10th ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.

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