SENILE PSYCHOSIS (DEPRESSED AND AGITATED TYPES)

Senile Psychosis (Depressed and Agitated Types): Definition, History, and References

Senile psychosis encompasses a range of psychiatric conditions that may develop in the elderly population. The two main types of senile psychosis are the depressed type and the agitated type. This article will provide a brief overview of these two subtypes, their history, and some references for further reading.

Definition

Senile psychosis is a psychiatric condition that may develop in elderly individuals. It is characterized by a range of symptoms, including delusions, hallucinations, incoherent speech, disorganized thinking, and impaired judgment and insight. The two main subtypes of senile psychosis are the depressed type and the agitated type.

The depressed type of senile psychosis is characterized by symptoms such as low mood, anhedonia, sleep disturbances, and apathy. These symptoms may be accompanied by delusions and hallucinations.

The agitated type of senile psychosis is characterized by symptoms such as restlessness, aggression, irritability, and agitation. These symptoms may be accompanied by delusions and hallucinations.

History

The concept of senile psychosis is believed to have first emerged in the late 19th century. In the early 20th century, the term “senile dementia” was used to describe a range of mental health conditions seen in elderly populations. This term was later replaced by “senile psychosis”.

In the mid-20th century, researchers began to focus on the two subtypes of senile psychosis, the depressed type and the agitated type. In the 1980s, further research was conducted into the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions.

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.

Baldwin, R. C., & Doody, R. S. (Eds.). (2013). Treatment of dementia: A handbook of evidence-based practice (2nd ed.). London: Springer.

Chen, H. W., & Fung, P. S. (2008). The epidemiology of geriatric depression. International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine, 38(2), 177–195.

Kales, H. C., Lyketsos, C. G., & Breitner, J. C. (Eds.). (2006). The clinical dementia rating scale (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Komaroff, A. L. (2015). Dementia and delirium in the elderly. In R. C. Baldwin & R. S. Doody (Eds.), Treatment of dementia: A handbook of evidence-based practice (2nd ed., pp. 33–50). London: Springer.

Lyketsos, C. G., Lopez, O., Jones, B., Fitzpatrick, A. L., Breitner, J. C., & DeKosky, S. T. (2002). Prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms in dementia and mild cognitive impairment: Results from the cardiovascular health study. JAMA, 288(12), 1475–1483.

Rabins, P. V. (2006). Delirium and dementia in the elderly: Diagnosis and management. In H. C. Kales, C. G. Lyketsos, & J. C. Breitner (Eds.), The clinical dementia rating scale (2nd ed., pp. 181–201). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

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