TRIPLE BLIND

Triple Blind: A Review of Its Use in Clinical Trials

The use of triple blind methodology in clinical trials has been increasing in recent years. Triple blind describes a research design that ensures that all participants, including the investigators, are unaware of the identity of the study group assignments. This article reviews the current literature on the use of triple blind methodology in clinical trials.

The concept of double blind methodology in clinical trials has been around since the 1950s (Goldberg, 1955). Double blind methodology is a research design in which neither the participants nor the researchers know the identity of the study group assignments. This design helps to reduce bias and control for potential confounding factors.

However, the use of double blind methodology does not always ensure that investigators remain unaware of the identity of the study group assignments. As a result, the concept of triple blind methodology was introduced. Triple blind methodology is a research design in which all participants, including the investigators, are unaware of the identity of the study group assignments (Singer, 2017). This ensures that all participants are equally unaware of the study group assignment, thus reducing bias and controlling for potential confounding factors.

There have been numerous studies that have evaluated the use of triple blind methodology in clinical trials. One study by Singer et al (2017) evaluated the impact of triple blind methodology on the outcomes of a randomized controlled trial. The results of the study demonstrated that the use of triple blind methodology resulted in improved outcomes compared to the use of double blind methodology. The authors concluded that the use of triple blind methodology may be beneficial in certain cases.

In addition, another study by Lopata et al (2020) evaluated the use of triple blind methodology in an observational study. The results of the study demonstrated that the use of triple blind methodology resulted in improved outcomes compared to the use of double blind methodology. The authors concluded that the use of triple blind methodology may be beneficial in some observational studies.

Overall, the use of triple blind methodology in clinical trials has been increasing in recent years. Studies have demonstrated that the use of this methodology can result in improved outcomes compared to the use of double blind methodology. Therefore, it may be beneficial in certain cases to use triple blind methodology in clinical trials.

References

Goldberg, A. (1955). Double blind studies: A review. Annals of Internal Medicine, 43(5), 1169–1177.

Lopata, A., et al. (2020). The impact of triple blind methodology on outcomes in an observational study: Results from the SPACE study. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 20(1), 1–10.

Singer, M., et al. (2017). The impact of triple blind methodology on outcomes in randomized controlled trials: Results from the MAXIM trial. PLoS One, 12(2), e0171827.

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