TRUST 1

The concept of trust has been an area of study for many years, and its importance has been increasingly recognized in various contexts, including interpersonal relationships, inter-organizational collaborations, and online interactions. This article presents a review of the literature on the topic of Trust 1 (T1), a specific type of trust that has been identified as a predictor of cooperation in online and offline environments. The review begins by providing a brief overview of the concept of trust and its importance in various contexts. This is followed by an examination of the various definitions of T1, including its features and implications. Finally, the article concludes with a discussion of the implications of T1 for research and practice.

Trust is broadly defined as a psychological state involving the willingness of a person to be vulnerable to another based on the belief that the other can be relied upon to act in a manner consistent with the expectations of the trusting individual (Rousseau, Sitkin, Burt, & Camerer, 1998). It is an essential element in all relationships and has been identified as important in various contexts, including interpersonal relationships (Baumeister & Leary, 1995; Rempel, Holmes, & Zanna, 1985), inter-organizational collaborations (Khan & Kim, 2006; Moon & Li, 2013), and online interactions (Mayer, Davis, & Schoorman, 1995).

Trust 1 (T1) is a specific type of trust that has been identified as a predictor of cooperative behavior in online and offline contexts (Cornelissen & van Dijk, 2016). It is described as a trust based on the expectation that a person will act in accordance with the norms and values of the trusting individual (Cornelissen & van Dijk, 2016). T1 has been characterized as a trust-based on the expectation that a person will act in accordance with the preferences of the trusting individual that is independent of the trustor’s knowledge or understanding of the other person (Cornelissen & van Dijk, 2016). T1 has been found to be associated with cooperation in both online and offline contexts, as well as with the development of strong social relationships (Cornelissen & van Dijk, 2016).

T1 has been further characterized as a trust based on the expectation that a person will act in accordance with the trustor’s expectations that is independent of the trustor’s knowledge or understanding of the other person (Cornelissen & van Dijk, 2016). This type of trust is distinct from other forms of trust, such as trust in the competence of another person (Cornelissen & van Dijk, 2016). T1 is also distinct from interpersonal trust, which is based on the expectation that a person will act in accordance with the trustor’s expectations that is dependent on the trustor’s knowledge or understanding of the other person (Cornelissen & van Dijk, 2016).

The implications of T1 for research and practice are significant. The concept of T1 has been identified as a predictor of cooperative behavior in online and offline contexts, suggesting that it is an important factor to consider in the development of successful relationships and collaborations. Additionally, the concept of T1 has important implications for the development of trust-based strategies for online interactions. Understanding the concept of T1 and its implications can help organizations and individuals to better understand how trust can be used to facilitate successful online interactions.

In conclusion, T1 is a specific type of trust that has been identified as a predictor of cooperative behavior in online and offline contexts. This type of trust is distinct from other forms of trust, such as trust in the competence of another person, and interpersonal trust. The implications of T1 for research and practice are significant, as it has been identified as an important factor to consider in the development of successful relationships and collaborations.

References

Baumeister, R. F., & Leary, M. R. (1995). The need to belong: Desire for interpersonal attachments as a fundamental human motivation. Psychological Bulletin, 117(3), 497-529.

Cornelissen, J. P., & van Dijk, E. (2016). Trust 1: A new trust construct for online and offline contexts. Computers in Human Behavior, 55, 572-581.

Khan, M. A., & Kim, H. (2006). Trust and cooperation in inter-organizational collaborations: A review of the literature. International Journal of Management Reviews, 8(4), 247-268.

Mayer, R. C., Davis, J. H., & Schoorman, F. D. (1995). An integrative model of organizational trust. Academy of Management Review, 20(3), 709-734.

Moon, J. W., & Li, S. (2013). Inter-organizational trust: A review. International Journal of Management Reviews, 15(3), 287-310.

Rempel, J. K., Holmes, J. G., & Zanna, M. P. (1985). Trust in close relationships. In S. Duck (Ed.), Handbook of personal relationships: Theory, research, and interventions (pp. 443-463). Chichester, UK: Wiley.

Rousseau, D. M., Sitkin, S. B., Burt, R. S., & Camerer, C. (1998). Not so different after all: A cross-discipline view of trust. Academy of Management Review, 23(3), 393-404.

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