UNIPOLAR MANIA

Unipolar mania is a type of bipolar disorder characterized by symptoms of mania without any depressive episodes. Mania is a state of intense euphoria, hyperactivity, and grandiosity, whereas depression is a state of low mood and energy. Unipolar mania is a distinct and diagnosable disorder that is often underdiagnosed and undertreated.

The exact cause of unipolar mania is unknown, but researchers believe that it is likely a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Certain genetic predispositions may increase a person’s risk for developing unipolar mania. In addition, certain environmental factors, such as stress, substance abuse, or major life events, may trigger the development of the disorder.

The primary symptom of unipolar mania is an elevated mood. People with the disorder may feel an increased sense of well-being, joy, and euphoria. They may be hyperactive and talkative, often engaging in risky or impulsive behaviors. They may also have grandiose beliefs about their own abilities or sense of importance. Other symptoms of unipolar mania can include increased energy, decreased need for sleep, racing thoughts, and distractibility.

Diagnosis of unipolar mania is made using the criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5). To be diagnosed with unipolar mania, a person must experience symptoms of mania for at least one week without experiencing any symptoms of depression. A clinician may also consider the person’s medical history, family history, and other mental health issues when making a diagnosis.

Treatment for unipolar mania typically involves a combination of medication and psychotherapy. Medications used to treat unipolar mania include antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and antidepressants. Psychotherapy, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, can help a person cope with the symptoms of unipolar mania. It can also help them identify and address any underlying issues that may be contributing to the disorder.

In conclusion, unipolar mania is a distinct and diagnosable disorder characterized by symptoms of mania without any depressive episodes. It is likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Treatment typically involves a combination of medication and psychotherapy.

References

American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Ketter, T. A., & Sachs, G. S. (2015). Unipolar mania—underrecognized and undertreated. Current Psychiatry Reports, 17(6), 544. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11920-015-0544-8

McIntyre, R. S., Mancini, D. A., & Kennedy, S. H. (2013). Understanding and managing unipolar mania. The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 58(1), 37–44. https://doi.org/10.1177/070674371305800104

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