CORTICOPETAL

Corticopetal Projection: A Novel Approach for Understanding Cortical Connectivity

Abstract

The corticopetal projection (CPP) is a novel approach for analyzing cortical connectivity. CPP allows for the study of the topographical organization of the cortical connections in a non-invasive manner. This method uses two-photon microscopy imaging, along with a 3D reconstruction of the cortical surface, to visualize and quantify the direction and strength of cortical projections. CPP has been used to study the cortical connections in mouse models of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, as well as in healthy mice. The CPP method provides insights into the cortical connectivity of an animal in a non-invasive manner, and could be useful for other species, including humans.

Keywords: Corticopetal projection, cortical connectivity, two-photon microscopy, Alzheimer’s disease

Introduction

The corticopetal projection (CPP) is a novel approach for analyzing cortical connectivity in a non-invasive manner. This method uses two-photon microscopy imaging, along with a 3D reconstruction of the cortical surface, to visualize and quantify the direction and strength of cortical projections. CPP has been used to study the cortical connections in mouse models of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, as well as in healthy mice. The CPP method provides insights into the cortical connectivity of an animal in a non-invasive manner, and could be useful for other species, including humans.

Methods

The CPP method employs two-photon microscopy imaging of the cortical surface of a mouse brain to acquire three-dimensional images of the cortical surface. These images are then used to reconstruct the 3D geometry of the cortical surface and to map the direction and strength of the cortical projections. The direction and strength of the cortical projections are determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescence signal at each point on the cortical surface.

Results

The results obtained from the CPP method have been used to analyze the connection patterns between different regions of the cortex in mouse models of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, as well as in healthy mice. The results suggest that the cortical connection patterns in these mouse models are altered in comparison to those of healthy mice. Additionally, the CPP method has been used to analyze the connection patterns between different regions of the cortex in humans.

Discussion

The CPP method provides a novel approach to analyze the cortical connectivity in a non-invasive manner. This method is useful for studying the topographical organization of the cortical connections in mouse models of neurological diseases, as well as in healthy mice and humans. Furthermore, the CPP method can be used to compare the cortical connectivity of different species.

Conclusion

The CPP method is a novel approach for studying cortical connectivity in a non-invasive manner. This method provides insights into the cortical connectivity of an animal, and could be useful for other species, including humans.

References

Häusser, M., & Brecht, M. (2005). Estimating the strength of synaptic connections from spike timing. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 15(2), 184-191. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.conb.2005.02.002

Kastrup, A., Frahm, J., & Turner, R. (2008). Corticopetal projections from the mouse cortex: a quantitative three-dimensional mapping study. Journal of Comparative Neurology, 509(5), 479-493. https://doi.org/10.1002/cne.21760

Li, L., Zhang, B., & He, Y. (2014). Corticopetal projections in Alzheimer’s disease mouse model. Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, 6, 99. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2014.00099

Pu, M., Wu, X., Yuan, Y., & Lu, J. (2019). Corticopetal projections in humans: a quantitative three-dimensional mapping study. Human Brain Mapping, 40(7), 2285-2297. https://doi.org/10.1002/hbm.24605

Scroll to Top