DEMOCRATIC PARENTING

Democratic Parenting: A Review of Parenting Style and Its Effects on Child Development

The aim of this review is to discuss democratic parenting and its effects on child development. This review will explore the concept of democratic parenting, its various components, and the implications for parents. The review will also discuss the effects of democratic parenting on children’s psychological, social, and academic development. The findings of this review suggest that democratic parenting has beneficial effects on children’s development, and that it is an important parenting style to consider when raising children.

Parenting style is an important factor in the development of children. According to Steinberg (2004), parenting style refers to the “manner in which parents respond to their children and interact with them”. Numerous parenting styles have been described, including authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive parenting (Darling & Steinberg, 1993; Maccoby & Martin, 1983). Democratic parenting is another parenting style that has been increasingly recognized in recent years. This style of parenting emphasizes the importance of communication and collaboration between parents and children, and encourages children to take responsibility for their own decisions.

Democratic parenting is based on the belief that children should be given the opportunity to express their opinions and be involved in decision-making processes (Baumrind, 1967). This style of parenting also encourages parents to be responsive to their children’s needs, but also to be firm and consistent in setting expectations for their behavior. In addition, democratic parenting requires parents to be open to their children’s ideas and to provide guidance and support as needed.

Research has shown that democratic parenting has beneficial effects on children’s development. Studies have found that children who are raised in a democratic parenting environment are more likely to have higher levels of self-esteem and self-confidence (Darling & Steinberg, 1993; Maccoby & Martin, 1983). Additionally, children who are raised in a democratic parenting environment are more likely to have better problem-solving skills, be more independent, and have better academic performance (Darling & Steinberg, 1993; Maccoby & Martin, 1983).

The findings of this review suggest that democratic parenting is an important parenting style to consider when raising children. This style of parenting encourages communication and collaboration between parents and children, and provides children with the opportunity to express their opinions and develop their own decision-making skills. Additionally, the research suggests that democratic parenting has beneficial effects on children’s psychological, social, and academic development. Therefore, parents should consider using democratic parenting in order to foster positive development in their children.

References

Baumrind, D. (1967). Child care practices anteceding three patterns of preschool behavior. Genetic Psychology Monographs, 75(1), 43-88.

Darling, N., & Steinberg, L. (1993). Parenting style as context: An integrative model. Psychological Bulletin, 113(3), 487-496.

Maccoby, E.E., & Martin, J.A. (1983). Socialization in the context of the family: Parent-child interaction. In P.H. Mussen (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology: Vol. 4. Socialization, personality, and social development (pp. 1-101). New York: John Wiley & Sons.

Steinberg, L. (2004). Adolescence (7th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

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