DESTRUDO

Destrudo, first coined by Freud in 1910, is a concept that is used to describe the instinctive drive for destruction. It is a concept that has been widely discussed in the literature and is seen as an important part of psychoanalytic theory. It is believed to be a part of the human psyche that is responsible for aggression and destructive behavior.

Destrudo is believed to be a part of the id which is the part of the psyche that is driven by instinct and seeks immediate satisfaction. It is believed to be in opposition to the ego which is the part of the psyche that is driven by reality and seeks to maintain a balance between the id and the superego. Destrudo is thought to be the source of aggression and destructive behavior and is seen as a necessary part of psychoanalytic theory.

Destrudo has been widely discussed in the literature and is seen as an important part of psychoanalytic theory. It has been used to explain various behaviors such as aggression and violence, as well as providing an understanding of the motivations of individuals to engage in destructive behavior. It has also been used to explain aspects of the human condition such as the need for power and control.

Overall, destrudo is an important concept in psychoanalytic theory and provides a useful way of understanding human behavior. It is seen as a necessary part of understanding the motivations of individuals to engage in destructive behaviors.

References

Freud, S. (1910). The psychoanalytic view of psychogenesis. In J. Strachey (Ed.), The Standard Edition of the Complete Psychological Works of Sigmund Freud (Vol. 5, pp. 11-17). London: Hogarth Press.

Klein, H. (2016). Aggression and Destrudo. In M. E. Miller (Ed.), The Encyclopedia of Psychoanalysis (pp. 327-329). London: Routledge.

Klein, H. (2005). Destrudo: Exploring Human Aggression and the Need for Power and Control. Psychoanalytic Inquiry, 25(4), 501-524.

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