EXTERNAL EAR

The external ear, also known as the auricle or pinna, is the visible portion of the ear that is responsible for collecting sound waves and transmitting them to the middle ear. It is composed of a thin, elastic cartilage covered with skin. It has a unique and complex shape that assists in the localization of sound sources and helps to protect the eardrum from debris (Kazmi, 2016).

The external ear is divided into three parts: the auricle, the ear canal, and the external acoustic meatus. The auricle is the outermost part of the external ear and consists of an oval-shaped cartilage with an attached earlobe. This cartilage helps to amplify and localize sound, and can be seen in various shapes and sizes in humans. The auricle is connected to the ear canal, which is lined with hair and glands that produce wax. The external acoustic meatus is the end of the ear canal and contains the eardrum.

The external ear plays an important role in the hearing process. As sound waves enter the ear canal, they are amplified and directed towards the eardrum. The eardrum then vibrates and transmits the sound to the inner ear. In addition, the external ear helps to protect the eardrum from debris and excessive noise.

There are several diseases that can affect the external ear, such as otitis externa, which is a bacterial infection of the ear canal. Other conditions include otomycosis, which is an infection of the ear canal caused by fungi, and exostoses, which are benign tumors that form on the outside of the ear canal.

In conclusion, the external ear is a complex structure that plays an important role in the hearing process. It is composed of the auricle, the ear canal, and the external acoustic meatus, and helps to amplify and localize sound, and protect the eardrum from debris and excessive noise. Various diseases can affect the external ear, and it is important to seek medical attention if any of these conditions are suspected.

References
Kazmi, S. (2016). Structure and Functions of the External Ear. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK493286/

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