INTERMARRIAGE

Intermarriage: A Review of Research

Intermarriage, or marriage between two individuals from different ethnic, racial, or religious backgrounds, has become increasingly common in the United States over the last several decades. This review examines the literature on intermarriage, exploring its prevalence, causes, consequences, and attitudes. The review finds that intermarriage is associated with a variety of positive outcomes, including increased acceptance of diversity and more positive attitudes toward different racial and ethnic groups.

Prevalence of Intermarriage

Intermarriage rates in the United States have been increasing steadily over the last several decades. According to a 2018 report from the Pew Research Center, 17% of all marriages in the U.S. are intermarriages, up from 7% in 1980. This increase has been largely driven by increased intermarriage among whites and Hispanics, though intermarriage among Asians has also grown significantly in recent years.

Causes of Intermarriage

Research suggests that there are a variety of factors that contribute to the increased prevalence of intermarriage in the U.S. These factors include increasing levels of education, increased geographic mobility, and changing attitudes about racial and ethnic diversity. Additionally, research has found that individuals who are more open to new experiences and who have a greater sense of self-efficacy are more likely to intermarry.

Consequences of Intermarriage

Research on the consequences of intermarriage has found a variety of positive outcomes. For example, intermarriage is associated with increased acceptance of diversity and more positive attitudes toward different racial and ethnic groups. Additionally, research has found that intermarriage is associated with increased cross-cultural understanding and increased mutual respect among different racial and ethnic groups.

Attitudes Toward Intermarriage

Research on public attitudes toward intermarriage has found that attitudes have become more positive in recent years. According to a 2017 survey by the Pew Research Center, a majority of Americans (63%) believe that intermarriage is good for society, up from 49% in 2010. Additionally, the survey found that support for intermarriage was higher among younger adults, with 77% of adults under age 30 expressing support for intermarriage.

Conclusion

This review has examined the literature on intermarriage, exploring its prevalence, causes, consequences, and attitudes. The review has found that intermarriage is becoming increasingly common in the United States and that it is associated with a variety of positive outcomes, including increased acceptance of diversity and more positive attitudes toward different racial and ethnic groups. Additionally, research has found that public attitudes toward intermarriage have become more positive in recent years.

References

Pew Research Center. (2018). Intermarriage in the U.S. 50 Years after Loving v. Virginia. Retrieved from https://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2018/06/12/intermarriage-in-the-u-s-50-years-after-loving-v-virginia/

Pew Research Center. (2017). Americans Widely Support Intermarriage. Retrieved from
https://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2017/05/18/americans-widely-support-intermarriage/

Fry, R., & Taylor, P. (2018). Shifting Patterns of Intermarriage. Retrieved from https://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2018/06/12/shifting-patterns-of-intermarriage/

Sternberg, R., & Mashek, D. (2012). Intermarriage and the Psychology of Love and Attraction. In R. Sternberg & K. Weis (Eds.), The New Psychology of Love (2nd ed., pp. 263-280). New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Cheryan, S., Plaut, V. C., Davies, P. G., & Steele, C. M. (2009). Ambivalent stereotypes about intellectual performance: Components, consequences, and reduction. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 13(3), 280-298.

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