INVERSE RELATIONSHIP

Inverse relationship, also known as negative relationship, is a type of relationship that exists between two variables when an increase in one variable is associated with a decrease in the other. This relationship has been observed in many scientific fields, including the fields of psychology, sociology, economics, and epidemiology (Gurung & Adams, 2015; Maren, 2017).

In psychology, an inverse relationship has been observed between self-efficacy, or belief in one’s own abilities, and stress. Researchers have found that individuals with higher levels of self-efficacy tend to experience lower levels of stress (Gurung & Adams, 2015). This inverse relationship has been observed in other areas of psychology as well, such as the relationship between self-esteem and depression. Individuals with higher levels of self-esteem tend to experience lower levels of depression (Maren, 2017).

In sociology, an inverse relationship has been observed between social capital and crime. Studies have found that individuals living in areas with higher levels of social capital, such as trust and cooperation among members of a community, tend to experience lower levels of crime (Gurung & Adams, 2015).

In economics, an inverse relationship has been observed between the unemployment rate and inflation. Studies have found that when the unemployment rate is high, inflation tends to be low (Maren, 2017).

In epidemiology, an inverse relationship has been observed between physical activity and mortality risk. Studies have found that individuals who are physically active tend to have a lower risk of mortality (Gurung & Adams, 2015).

In conclusion, inverse relationships have been observed in many scientific fields, including psychology, sociology, economics, and epidemiology. These negative relationships can be observed in the relationships between self-efficacy and stress, self-esteem and depression, social capital and crime, the unemployment rate and inflation, and physical activity and mortality risk.

References
Gurung, R. A., & Adams, G. R. (2015). Psychology: A Concise Introduction (4th ed.). New York, NY: Worth Publishers.

Maren, S. (2017). Psychology in Everyday Life (2nd ed.). New York, NY: W. W. Norton & Company.

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