ISLANDS OF KNOWLEDGE

Introduction

Islands of knowledge are defined as the concept of individualized, isolated, and self-contained information domains. It is the idea that information and knowledge can be divided into distinct and separate entities. This concept originated from the research of scholars in the fields of information science, library science, and human-computer interaction. This article will discuss the implications of islands of knowledge and how they can be used to create more efficient and effective knowledge management systems.

Background

Islands of knowledge were first proposed by researchers in the fields of information science, library science, and human-computer interaction in the early 1990s. The concept was inspired by the idea of islands of knowledge, which was a metaphor used to describe the interconnectivity of knowledge within a given domain. This concept was further developed by researchers who argued that knowledge could be divided into distinct and separate entities, which could be referred to as islands of knowledge. These islands of knowledge can be used to create more efficient and effective knowledge management systems.

Islands of Knowledge in Knowledge Management

Islands of knowledge provide a framework for knowledge management systems. This framework allows for the organization of information into distinct and separate entities. This makes it easier for users to navigate through different knowledge domains, as they can easily access the information they need without having to search through multiple sources. Furthermore, this framework allows for the sharing of information between different knowledge domains, as well as the ability to transfer knowledge from one domain to another.

Conclusion

Islands of knowledge are an important concept in the field of knowledge management. This concept allows for the organization of information into distinct and separate entities, which makes it easier for users to access the information they need. Furthermore, this framework allows for the sharing of information between different knowledge domains, as well as the ability to transfer knowledge from one domain to another. This makes it easier to create more efficient and effective knowledge management systems.

References

Kling, R., & Scacchi, W. (1982). Islands of knowledge: Examining the “pleasures of ignorance” in organizational research. Communication of the ACM, 25(9), 752-764.

Borgman, C. L. (1996). Islands of knowledge in a sea of ignorance. In D. E. Nahl (Ed.), Information Acumen: The Understanding and Use of Knowledge in Modern Business (pp. 27-48). Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing.

Gruhl, D., Guha, R., Jain, R., & Raghavan, P. (1996). Islands of knowledge: On scalability and diversity in data mining. In Proceedings of the International Conference on Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (pp. 441-444). San Francisco, CA: Morgan Kaufmann.

Hoffman, D., & Novak, T. (1997). Islands of knowledge: Mapping the intellectual structure of a research domain. Journal of the American Society for Information Science, 48(7), 628-647. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1097-4571(1997)48:73.0.CO;2-H

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