LIKING SCALE

Liking Scale: An Overview

The Liking Scale is a psychometric instrument designed to measure an individual’s level of agreement or disagreement with a statement or attitude. It is widely used in various areas of research, such as marketing, health, and education, to evaluate individual preferences, attitudes, and beliefs. This article provides an overview of the Liking Scale, its development, and its applications in research.

Development

The Liking Scale was developed by psychologist George Katona in 1938. He proposed that the scale could be used to measure the intensity of an individual’s liking or disliking of an object, statement, or attitude. Katona argued that the scale should be composed of 11-point categorical statements that rated the intensity of an individual’s preference. The scale was later refined by other psychologists, such as Gordon Allport and Thurstone, who argued that the scale should be composed of 7-point categorical statements.

Applications

The Liking Scale is now used in a variety of research areas, such as marketing, health, and education. In marketing, the scale is used to evaluate an individual’s attitude towards a product or brand. In health, the scale is used to measure an individual’s attitudes towards a particular health issue or behavior. In education, the scale is used to assess an individual’s attitude towards a certain topic or course.

Conclusion

The Liking Scale is a psychometric instrument designed to measure an individual’s level of agreement or disagreement with a statement or attitude. It was developed by George Katona in 1938 and has since been refined by other psychologists. The scale is now widely used in various areas of research, such as marketing, health, and education, to evaluate individual preferences, attitudes, and beliefs.

References

Allport, G. W., & Thurstone, L. L. (1931). The measurement of attitudes. Psychological Bulletin, 28(5), 546–558.

Katona, G. (1938). The psychological analysis of the liking scale. Psychological Bulletin, 35(2), 195–225.

Krosnick, J. A., & Alwin, D. F. (1987). An evaluation of a cognitive theory of response-order effects in survey measurement. Public Opinion Quarterly, 51(2), 201–219.

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