OCCUPATIONAL ADJUSTMENT

Introduction
Occupational adjustment is a concept that is relevant to individuals’ work-related experiences. It involves the individual’s ability to adjust to the demands of a particular job or to make changes to their work environment in order to improve their job performance or satisfaction. Occupational adjustment is an important component of overall job satisfaction and productivity. The purpose of this article is to review the literature on occupational adjustment and to discuss the various factors that can influence an individual’s ability to adjust to the demands of their work environment.

Literature Review
The literature on occupational adjustment is vast and has been studied from various different perspectives. The most common framework used to understand occupational adjustment is the Job Demands-Resources model (JD-R), which has been used to analyze the factors that may be associated with job satisfaction, productivity, and well-being (Bakker, Demerouti, & Sanz-Vergel, 2014). This model suggests that job demands, such as workload, time pressure, and conflict, are inversely related to job resources, such as autonomy, task variety, and feedback.

Other research has focused on the individual differences that may be associated with occupational adjustment. For example, studies have suggested that personality traits such as extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness may be associated with better occupational adjustment (Hogan & Holland, 2003). Additionally, research has suggested that certain work characteristics, such as job autonomy, job security, and job satisfaction, may be associated with better occupational adjustment (Schaufeli & Bakker, 2004).

Conclusion
In conclusion, occupational adjustment is an important concept in the study of work-related experiences. The Job Demands-Resources model is the most commonly used framework to understand occupational adjustment, and it suggests that job demands and job resources are inversely related. Additionally, research has suggested that certain individual differences, such as personality traits, and job characteristics, such as job autonomy, may be associated with better occupational adjustment.

References
Bakker, A. B., Demerouti, E., & Sanz-Vergel, A. I. (2014). Burnout and work engagement: The JD-R approach. Annual review of organizational psychology and organizational behavior, 1(1), 389-411.

Hogan, R., & Holland, B. (2003). Using theory to evaluate personality and job-performance relations: A socioanalytic perspective. Journal of Applied Psychology, 88(1), 100-112.

Schaufeli, W. B., & Bakker, A. B. (2004). Job demands, job resources, and their relationship with burnout and engagement: A multi-sample study. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 25(3), 293-315.

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