OUTCOME INTERDEPENDENCE

Outcome Interdependence is an important concept in social psychology, which refers to the way in which one person’s outcomes are affected by the outcomes of other people. This concept has been studied in a variety of contexts, such as social networks, coalitions, group decision making, and intergroup competition. Outcome Interdependence has been found to be a powerful predictor of behavior, beliefs, and attitudes in many different contexts.

Outcome Interdependence is a form of interdependence, which is defined as “a situation in which two or more individuals or groups depend on each other to achieve their goals.” This means that when one person’s goals cannot be achieved without the help of another person or group, the outcomes of the two individuals or groups are interdependent. Outcome Interdependence can be either negative or positive. Negative Outcome Interdependence occurs when the outcomes of one person or group are dependent on the outcomes of another person or group in a negative way, meaning that the outcomes of one person or group are made worse if the outcomes of the other person or group are made better. Positive Outcome Interdependence occurs when the outcomes of one person or group are dependent on the outcomes of another person or group in a positive way, meaning that the outcomes of one person or group are made better if the outcomes of the other person or group are also made better.

Outcome Interdependence has been studied in a variety of contexts, such as social networks, coalitions, group decision making, and intergroup competition. In social networks, outcomes are interdependent when the success of one individual depends on the success of other individuals in the network. For example, an individual’s success in a network may be dependent on the success of his or her friends and family. In coalitions, outcomes are interdependent when the success of one group depends on the success of other groups in the coalition. For example, in a coalition of two political parties, the success of one party may be dependent on the success of the other party. In group decision making, outcomes are interdependent when an individual’s decisions are influenced by the decisions of other individuals in the group. In intergroup competition, outcomes are interdependent when the success of one group depends on the success of other groups.

Outcome Interdependence has been found to be a powerful predictor of behavior, beliefs, and attitudes in many different contexts. For example, Outcome Interdependence has been found to affect the way people interact with each other, how they make decisions, and how they view the world. Outcome Interdependence has also been found to affect the way people view themselves and others, and the way they negotiate and cooperate.

Overall, Outcome Interdependence is an important concept in social psychology. It is a form of interdependence that can affect the behavior, beliefs, and attitudes of individuals and groups in a variety of contexts. Outcome Interdependence is a powerful predictor of behavior, beliefs, and attitudes in many different contexts, and it is important to understand its implications for social interactions and decision making.

References

Baron, R. A., & Kerr, N. L. (2003). Group Process, Group Decision, Group Action. Buckingham, UK: Open University Press.

Cialdini, R. B., & Trost, M. R. (1998). Social influence: Social norms, conformity, and compliance. In D. T. Gilbert, S. T. Fiske, & G. Lindzey (Eds.), The handbook of social psychology (4th ed., Vol. 2, pp. 151-192). New York, NY: McGraw Hill.

Gruenfeld, D. H. (1996). Interdependence and group behavior. In M. Zanna (Ed.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology (Vol. 28, pp. 311-378). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.

Kerr, N. L., & Kaufman, S. R. (1984). Interdependence in small groups: Causes and consequences. In L. Berkowitz (Ed.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology (Vol. 17, pp. 1-47). New York, NY: Academic Press.

Kurzban, R., & Houser, D. (2001). Outcome interdependence and cooperation. Psychological Review, 108, 584-604.

Macy, M. W. (1995). Network interdependence and group dynamism. In M. Zanna (Ed.), Advances in Experimental Social Psychology (Vol. 27, pp. 1-53). San Diego, CA: Academic Press.

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