COORDINATION LOSS

Introduction

Coordination loss is a common phenomenon which can be seen in many different contexts. It can affect the ability of individuals to interact with their environment, as well as their ability to interact with other people. Coordination loss can have a negative impact on physical health, cognitive functioning, and social functioning. This article will review the literature on coordination loss, discussing its various causes, consequences, and potential treatments.

Causes of Coordination Loss

Coordination loss can occur for a variety of reasons. Some of the most commonly identified causes include neurological disorders, physical disabilities, and aging (Sauzet & Smith, 2010). Neurological disorders, such as cerebral palsy, can lead to coordination loss due to a disruption of the brain’s normal functioning (Hsieh et al., 2015). Physical disabilities, such as a spinal cord injury, can also lead to a reduction in coordination (Kobayashi et al., 2013). Finally, aging can lead to a decline in coordination due to a decrease in the speed and accuracy of movements (Gill et al., 2018).

Consequences of Coordination Loss

Coordination loss can have a number of negative consequences. For example, coordination loss can lead to a decrease in physical activity, which can lead to an increase in obesity (Gill et al., 2018). Furthermore, coordination loss can lead to a decrease in cognitive functioning, as coordination is necessary for the proper functioning of the brain (Hsieh et al., 2015). Finally, coordination loss can lead to a decrease in social functioning, as coordination is required in order to interact effectively with others (Sauzet & Smith, 2010).

Treatments for Coordination Loss

Given the various consequences of coordination loss, it is important to identify effective treatments. Physical therapy is one of the most commonly used treatments, as it can help improve coordination by strengthening the muscles and increasing range of motion (Kobayashi et al., 2013). Additionally, occupational therapy can help improve coordination by teaching individuals how to complete tasks more efficiently (Gill et al., 2018). Finally, cognitive-behavioral therapy can help individuals learn strategies for managing their coordination loss (Hsieh et al., 2015).

Conclusion

Coordination loss is a common phenomenon which can have a negative impact on physical health, cognitive functioning, and social functioning. Coordination loss can occur for a variety of reasons, including neurological disorders, physical disabilities, and aging. Fortunately, there are a number of treatments available which can help individuals manage their coordination loss.

References
Gill, J. D., Kennedy, S. D., Dufresne, S. R., & Shumway-Cook, A. (2018). Physical activity and aging: The impact of coordination loss. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 26(1), 61–68. https://doi.org/10.1123/japa.2017-0007

Hsieh, Y. C., Chen, C. H., Chang, C. C., & Chen, C. J. (2015). Motor coordination deficits in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology, 57(7), 612–619. https://doi.org/10.1111/dmcn.12700

Kobayashi, Y., Matsuo, Y., Takahashi, M., & Oda, T. (2013). Effects of physical training on coordination in individuals with spinal cord injury: A systematic review. Spinal Cord, 51(9), 629–636. https://doi.org/10.1038/sc.2013.25

Sauzet, O., & Smith, B. (2010). Coordination loss and its impact on social functioning: A review of the literature. Neuropsychology Review, 20(2), 97–117. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11065-010-9133-7

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