FETISHISM

Fetishism: Definition, History, and References for Further Reading

Introduction
Fetishism is an interest in or strong attachment to a physical object or activity that occupies an abnormal place in a person’s life. The object or activity is often associated with an erotic or emotional response that is both pleasurable and fulfilling. Fetishism is a form of paraphilia, which is a mental disorder characterized by intense and persistent sexual arousal from atypical objects or activities. This article provides an overview of fetishism, its history, and references for further reading.

Definition
Fetishism is defined as a form of paraphilia characterized by intense and persistent arousal from an inanimate object or activity. This object or activity is usually associated with an erotic or emotional response, and may be of a sexual or non-sexual nature. This arousal is often accompanied by a strong attachment to and need for the object or activity, and may be the only way to achieve sexual gratification. People with a fetish may experience difficulty in engaging in sexual activities without their fetish object or activity present.

History
The term “fetishism” first appeared in the medical literature in the late 19th century. At the time, it was used to describe an attachment to an inanimate object or activity that was believed to give its possessor magical powers. This concept was first described by the anthropologist Charles de Brosses in his 1760 book, Du culte des dieux fétiches. The term was later adopted by Sigmund Freud in his 1905 book, Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality. Freud believed that fetishism was an attempt to compensate for the absence of a penis in women. This idea has since been largely rejected by the scientific community.

Conclusion
Fetishism is an interest in or strong attachment to a physical object or activity that occupies an abnormal place in a person’s life. It is a form of paraphilia, which is a mental disorder characterized by intense and persistent sexual arousal from atypical objects or activities. The term “fetishism” first appeared in the medical literature in the late 19th century, and has since been studied extensively by the scientific community.

References
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing.

Freud, S. (1905). Three essays on the theory of sexuality. London, England: Hogarth Press.

Grant, J. E., & Coleman, E. (2008). Paraphilic disorders. Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 31(2), 363-383. doi:10.1016/j.psc.2007.11.001

Kafka, M. P. (2010). The paraphilia‐related disorders: An empirical investigation of nonparaphilic hypersexuality disorders in males. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, 36(5), 389-404. doi:10.1080/0092623X.2010.491810

Moser, C. (2009). Fetishism. In J. E. Grant & M. N. Matsushita (Eds.), The encyclopedia of clinical psychology (pp. 899-902). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

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