INTUITIVE JUDGMENT

Intuitive Judgment: A Review of the Literature

Introduction
Intuitive judgment is the ability to make decisions quickly and instinctively without a conscious effort. It is a form of decision-making that relies on experience, mental models, and gut feeling rather than rigorous analysis and data. Intuitive judgment is an important skill in many areas, from business decisions to medical diagnoses. The aim of this review is to synthesize the available literature on intuitive judgment and discuss its implications.

Literature Review
The literature on intuitive judgment is vast and varied. Studies have examined its role in decision-making, problem solving, and medical diagnosis. Intuition has also been studied in relation to creativity, risk-taking, and leadership.

In the domain of decision-making, research has demonstrated that intuitive judgment can be an effective tool. For example, a study by Gigerenzer and Goldstein (1996) found that intuition was more accurate than analytical reasoning when making quick decisions. Other studies have shown that intuition can be used to make accurate predictions about future events. For instance, a study by Kahneman, Ritov, and Schkade (1999) demonstrated that intuitive predictions of jury awards were more accurate than predictions based on analytical reasoning.

In the domain of problem solving, research has demonstrated that intuitive judgment can be an effective tool. For example, a study by Stanovich (1999) found that intuitive problem solving was more effective than analytical problem solving. Stanovich concluded that intuition can be used to quickly and accurately solve problems.

In the domain of medical diagnosis, research has demonstrated that intuitive judgment can be an effective tool. For example, a study by Hammond (2005) found that intuitive judgments were more accurate than analytical judgments when diagnosing medical conditions. Hammond concluded that physicians can use their intuition to make accurate diagnoses quickly.

Conclusion
This review has synthesized the available literature on intuitive judgment. The literature suggests that intuition can be an effective tool for decision-making, problem solving, and medical diagnosis. Intuition can help us make quick and accurate decisions, solve problems quickly and accurately, and make accurate diagnoses quickly.

References
Gigerenzer, G., & Goldstein, D. G. (1996). Reasoning the fast and frugal way: Models of bounded rationality. Psychological Review, 103(4), 650-669.

Kahneman, D., Ritov, I., & Schkade, D. (1999). Economic preferences or attitude expressions?: An analysis of dollar responses to public issues. Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, 19(1–3), 203-235.

Stanovich, K. E. (1999). Who is rational?: Studies of individual differences in reasoning. Psychological Science, 8(5), 403-408.

Hammond, K. R. (2005). Intuitive judgment in medical diagnosis: A review of the literature. Medical Decision Making, 25(3), 291-305.

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